blow

I UK [bləʊ] / US [bloʊ] verb
Word forms "blow":
present tense I/you/we/they blow he/she/it blows present participle blowing past tense blew UK [bluː] / US [blu] past participle blown UK [bləʊn] / US [bloʊn]
***
1)
a) [intransitive] if wind or air blows, the air moves

A strong wind was blowing across the moors.

There's an awful draught blowing in through this window.

b) [intransitive/transitive] if something blows or is blown somewhere, the wind moves it there

The wind was blowing snow along the street.

A man died after being blown into the sea.

Newspapers and plastic bags were blowing about in the wind.

A strong gust of wind blew his hat off his head.

2) [intransitive] to push out air from your mouth

He bent towards the candle and blew gently.

If your soup's too hot, blow on it.

a) [transitive] to move something by pushing out air from your mouth
blow something off/away:

She picked up a book and blew the dust off it.

b) [transitive] to form something by pushing out air from your mouth
blow bubbles:

Two little boys were sitting on the steps, blowing bubbles.

blow glass:

Visitors can watch the men blowing glass in the workshop.

3) [intransitive/transitive] to make a sound by pushing air through something such as a whistle or a musical instrument

The guard blew his whistle and the train started.

4) [intransitive/transitive] if something electrical blows, it stops working, usually because too much electricity has passed through it

The light bulb in the projector had blown.

A power surge blew all the fuses, and the house was plunged into darkness.

5) blow or blow out
[intransitive/transitive] if a tyre blows, or if you blow it, it bursts

Kathy was turning the corner when one of the front tyres blew.

6) [transitive] informal to destroy your own chance of succeeding, or to waste a good opportunity

I've completely blown my diet with that piece of chocolate cake.

blow it:

We were in with a good chance for that contract but you've really blown it now!

7) [transitive] informal to spend a lot of money quickly on things that you do not need

He inherited a fortune but blew it on bad investments and a luxurious lifestyle.

8) [transitive] American very informal to leave a place quickly

Let's blow this joint.

blow a fuse/gasketinformal to suddenly become very angry

The trouble with Roy is he's likely to blow a fuse and hit someone.

blow (it)British

informal old-fashioned used when you are annoyed about something, or for saying in an annoyed way that you do not care about something


Oh blow it! Now I'll have to start all over again.

blow (someone) a kiss — to kiss your hand and pretend to blow or throw the kiss to someone

blow someone/something out of the waterinformal to show that something is completely false or wrong; informal to defeat someone easily

We found evidence that blew his case out of the water.

They think they can blow their rivals out of the water with this product.

blow your (own) trumpetBritish to proudly tell other people about your own achievements and successes

I don't want to blow my own trumpet, but I think it's pretty good.

blow (someone) a raspberryBritish to make a rude sound by putting your tongue through your lips and blowing

blow something to bits/pieces — to completely destroy something in an explosion, so that it breaks into many small pieces

The entire car was blown to bits when the device went off.

blow your top/stackinformal to suddenly become very angry

The boss will blow his top when he hears about this.

Phrasal verbs:
See:
cobweb, gaff, hot I, proportion, sky-high, steam I

II UK [bləʊ] / US [bloʊ] noun [countable]
Word forms "blow":
singular blow plural blows
**
1) a hard hit from someone's hand or an object

The victim was apparently killed by a blow to the head with a heavy object.

They knocked him down and pummelled him with blows.

2)
a) an event that spoils your chances of success

Losing a second match would be a major blow to his world title hopes.

deal a blow to something:

The closure of the factory dealt a devastating blow to the local economy.

b) an event that causes you to feel very sad, disappointed, or shocked
a real blow:

Her mother's death was a real blow to her.

come as a blow:

It came as a bit of a blow when he found out she was married.

3) an act of blowing air from your mouth or nose
See:
cushion II, soften, strike I

English dictionary. 2014.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Blow — Blow, v. t. 1. To force a current of air upon with the mouth, or by other means; as, to blow the fire. [1913 Webster] 2. To drive by a current air; to impel; as, the tempest blew the ship ashore. [1913 Webster] Off at sea northeast winds blow… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Blow — may refer to: *Blowing, or exhalation *Strike (attack) *Drug slang for cocaine * Blow (film), a 2001 American film about drug trafficking * Blow ( My Name Is Earl ), a season 2 episode of My Name is Earl *Blow (drink), a brand of energy drink… …   Wikipedia

  • blow — [bləʊ ǁ bloʊ] verb blew PASTTENSE [bluː] blown PASTPART [bləʊn ǁ bloʊn] [transitive] 1. informal if you blow money on something, you spend a lot of money on it, often money that you cannot afford: • He blew his wages on a new stereo …   Financial and business terms

  • Blow — «Blow» Сингл Кеша из альбома …   Википедия

  • blow — Ⅰ. blow [1] ► VERB (past blew; past part. blown) 1) (of wind) move creating an air current. 2) propel or be propelled by the wind. 3) expel air through pursed lips. 4) force air through the mouth into (an instrument) to make a sound …   English terms dictionary

  • Blow-Up — Données clés Titre original Blowup Réalisation Michelangelo Antonioni Scénario Michelangelo Antonioni Tonino Guerra Edward Bond d après Julio Cortázar Acteurs principaux David Hemmings …   Wikipédia en Français

  • blow — blow1 [blō] vi. blew, blown, blowing [ME blowen < OE blawan < IE * bhlē : see BLAST] 1. to move with some force: said of the wind or a current of air 2. to send forth air with or as with the mouth 3. to pant; be breathless …   English World dictionary

  • Blow — Blow, v. i. [imp. {Blew} (bl[=u]); p. p. {Blown} (bl[=o]n); p. pr. & vb. n. {Blowing}.] [OE. blawen, blowen, AS. bl[=a]wan to blow, as wind; akin to OHG. pl[=a]jan, G. bl[ a]hen, to blow up, swell, L. flare to blow, Gr. ekflai nein to spout out,… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Blow Up — is a club night that was founded in the early 1990s by promoter and DJ Paul Tunkin at a North London pub called The Laurel Tree . The night quickly became the centre of the emerging Britpop scene in Camden attracting long queues of people eager… …   Wikipedia

  • Blow-up — Titre original Blowup Réalisation Michelangelo Antonioni Acteurs principaux David Hemmings Vanessa Redgrave Peter Bowles Sarah Miles Scénario Michelangelo Antonioni Tonino Guerra Edward Bond d après Julio Cortázar …   Wikipédia en Français

  • Blow Up — Titre original Blowup Réalisation Michelangelo Antonioni Acteurs principaux David Hemmings Vanessa Redgrave Peter Bowles Sarah Miles Scénario Michelangelo Antonioni Tonino Guerra Edward Bond d après Julio Cortázar …   Wikipédia en Français


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